A Plague On Both Your Houses! (Or ‘Why I Don’t Like Observations and Lesson Plans’)

This is a blog by Jemma Sherwood. I have reblogged it.

The World Is Maths

Over the last [insert large number here] years, the lesson observation and associated lesson plan have been the status symbol of the excellent teacher. Schools living in dread of the next Ofsted inspection elevated them to their position at the top of the individual’s evidence pile. For any observation, objectives were set out, detailing what ALL must learn, what MOST should learn and what SOME were lucky enough to learn, the minutiae of every activity and its purpose were described, every instance of cross-curricular/social/moral/cultural learning was noted and, in all probability, everything was colour-coded (ok, I made that last bit up, but it wouldn’t surprise me).

The thing is, this doesn’t really help anybody:

  • If shared with students, ALL/MOST/SOME objectives give anyone feeling lazy opportunity to opt out. If not shared with students it still means you expect the best bits to only be accessed by a few. What a…

View original post 674 more words

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